Syria: To Intervene, or not to Intervene

By Elizabeth Scott
posted on April 22, 2013 in

Sometimes you can’t beat The Onion for brutal, telling honesty:

'Syrians' Lives Are Worthless,' Obama Tells Daughters Before Kissing Them Goodnight

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Foreign Policy in the 2012 Presidential Election Op-Eds #2

By
posted on September 24, 2012 in

 

Domestic Spending and Foreign Policy in the 2012 Election

By Jean Humbrecht, Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives

In an election which previously seemed to be focused on the economy and the stagnant job market, Republican nominee Mitt Romney’s selection of Paul Ryan as his vice president will undoubtedly bring foreign policy to the spotlight. 

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Foreign Policy in the 2012 Presidential Election Op-Eds #1

By
posted on September 24, 2012 in

      Russia: “Geopolitical Foe” or Strategic Partner 

By Nolan Pick, Deputy Director of the Washington International Business Council and the Executive Council on Diplomacy

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A Game-Changing Spy & the Fourth of July

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posted on July 4, 2012 in ,

To the man who brought down the most damaging spy in U.S. history, the Fourth of July is about more than cold beer, fireworks and hotdogs - it's also about remembering the reason for the season: our freedom.

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The Cook's Dilemma

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posted on May 9, 2012 in

With America’s “pivot” toward the Asia-Pacific region, President Obama announced an outline for a trans-pacific partnership that excludes those countries that do not “follow the rules” and signaled U.S. intent to rotate Marines though Australia. These actions suggest that the U.S.-China relationship is trending toward a more confrontational balance of power dynamic. How did this relationship come to such a point of increased tension and friction? From 1972 to 1991, the two countries shared a common strategic objective –balancing the USSR. This shared objective led the U.S.

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Seeking A Solution For Syria

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posted on April 3, 2012 in

Last week, YPFP’s Middle East Discussion Group (MEDG) gathered to discuss four options for U.S. intervention in Syria: diplomacy, military intervention, economic actions, and wait-and-see. Even with the broadest of parameters, the group did not agree on one approach. There were some who made the argument that for both humanitarian concerns and U.S. national security interests, it would be prudent to take military action soon.

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